Acetazolamide responsive episodic ataxia treated with methazolamide: a case report

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DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3823/1602

Abstract

Acetazolamide-responsive ataxia is a rare episodic ataxia (EA) disorder characterized by paroxysmal cerebellar ataxia. Many of the symptoms with EA can be treated with the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide. EA is a family of channelopathies each with its own unique mutation. We report a case of EA treated with methlazolamide in a 37 year old man who experienced dysguesia with acetazolamide. Methazolamide has higher rates of diffusion into the tissue and a longer half-life compared with acetazolamide. It should be considered for episodic ataxia.

References

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Maren, T. H. (1984). The General Physiology of Reactions Catalyzed by Carbonic Anhydrase and Their Inhibition by Sulfonamides. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 429(1 Biology and C), 568-579.

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Published

2015-01-12

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Neurology